change.

change.



cityofathena:

honk-honk-its-gamzee:

moistchunkyslurp:

annabellebanna:

omg i am laughing so hard at the Miss Universe costume category

image

you got poland lookin nice

image

Namibia workin it

image

Costa Rica goin big, what did you expect

image

Haiti fuckin rockin it

image

Great Britain got damn

image

Switzerland hell yeah

and then

image

….Miss USA.

we had to be a fucking transformer

is this real life

reblogging this again just to add
image

canada HAD TO BE a fuckign mountie are you kidding me

but did you guys see this: 

image

DAMN MÉXICO



onlylolgifs:

First person to buy an iPhone 6 in Perth immediately drops it

onlylolgifs:

First person to buy an iPhone 6 in Perth immediately drops it



(Source: lesstalkmorebeauty)



thewarblerette:

mrthorinton:

clarabosswald:

so i saw this photo of a harpy eagleimageand i thought “woah what a noble beast” so i searched for more photos and i justimageimage

imageimage

imageeven the babiesimagei meanimage

this goes with almost all predator birds 

like look at this bearded vulture

image

such a majestic creature

image

but then it’s like

image

or this scretary bird like woah so beautiful

image

nope

image

even good old bald eagle

like wow so regal

image

what

image

it just looks confused image

LIFE LESSON: DON’T LOOK AT MAJESTIC BIRDS STRAIGHT ON.



(Source: 500px.com)



crystalballsaveusall:

Her makeup.

crystalballsaveusall:

Her makeup.

(Source: glamourqueenn)



fat-lasts-longer-than-flavor:

cuadradonegro:

obscurewings:

I made a political cartoon for English class about issues in school
It focuses on how teens are expected to make career defining choices with barely any experience, and also how parents often take so much authority that their child’s decision is not actually their own
If this gets some notes then I’ll make a colored version

thank fucking you. this defines me a few years ago really accurately

this

fat-lasts-longer-than-flavor:

cuadradonegro:

obscurewings:

I made a political cartoon for English class about issues in school

It focuses on how teens are expected to make career defining choices with barely any experience, and also how parents often take so much authority that their child’s decision is not actually their own

If this gets some notes then I’ll make a colored version

thank fucking you. this defines me a few years ago really accurately

this



-annoying:

the “i’m not afraid to verbally assault a middle schooler if they look at my kid the wrong way” haircut

image



eros-dikaios:

kanirou:

fatfeistyandfashionable:

bathsabbath:

piscula:

skooth:

bhavatarini:

myblacksexuality:

poetofwar333:

#cleopatra with the nose knocked off. I wonder if people still think she was European like the movies betray…

I still think it’s one of the most desperate things whites have done to blacks and to black history. The disrespect is outrageous. They came to our country and mentally could not fathom how these black civilizations could be so great. They literally rode through our lands and shot the noses off of our statues. Why? So that the statues would no longer resemble the African people and they could LIE about the origins of Egypt and countless other civilizations. It was a widespread practice. It’s why statues of Pharaoh’s and their wives have no noses. It’s why the Sphinx has no nose. When I was in middle and high school, we were taught that the noses had fell off due to time and poor craftsmanship! They have literally tried to teach us that our ancestors were shitty builders of noses just to hide their malicious destruction of our heritage. European fears of African peoples had to come from somewhere. I want to know what part of the history is missing. There’s something that they don’t want to be told.

The shade is real

i was taught that the noses fell off as well and actually continued to believe this. in retrospect this makes no sense, considering greek/roman statues pretty much always have intact noses whereas egyptian ones are always conveniently missing theirs. thank you for pointing this out to me, i hadn’t even made that connection until now.

The bolded was me too and I am seriously embarrassed that I never even thought about how that could be false.

Damnnn. I hate myself for not realizing this.
    I hate myself even more, since I know the ancient Egyptians created their sculptural works with the idea of permanence in mind. They were literally built to last throughout the afterlife. Notice how the majority of their monumental sculpture is stone-bound, without any protruding elements or breakable appendages. That’s because many of these sculptures were intended to house the life-force (Ka) of those they portrayed. Of their favorite materials were basalt and diorite, both extremely hard stones that were incredibly difficult to carve. Meaning a nose just doesn’t “fall off” because of “poor craftsmanship,” you would literally have to take a hammer to it. Fuckers.

I’m embarrassed and ashamed to add myself to the list of people who where taught that the noses “fell off” as a child and never once stopped to think about how incongruous that was to everything I had been taught about the Egyptian civilizations and their propensity for lasting works of art.

This is so inaccurate. 
Noses are always the first thing to go on statues, they protrude from the rest of the sculpture and are unsupported. This is true of Greek and Roman statues as well. This is Sulla, Roman general, consul, dictator, reformer, and kind of important. This is also the best bust we have of him and the one you will find in just about any textbook. 

Also, can we pause to think about environment here? The Mediterranean is much more long-lasting-statue friendly than Egypt is. Differences in humidity, wind patterns, building materials, and especially sand storms have immense effect on how well statues and carvings are preserved. 
More importantly, statue defamation was a practice that goes far back into Egyptian history itself. As previously (and accurately) mentioned, many statues were believed to either contain, preserve, or safeguard a deceased’s spirit after death. Burial statues would be deliberately defaced as acts of revenge, intimidation, or political leverage in times of upheaval. Political rival wants to hit you where it hurts? Deface your family’s statues. New dynasty in charge? Deface every statue of the old blood so their spirits can never hurt you. 
An unfortunately perfect example involves Hatshepsut, Queen and Pharaoh of Egypt who was immensely successful and powerful. Upon the succession of Thutmose III, he eventually ordered that all public images of her be defaced, some merely having the facial features knocked off, or sometimes full-out erasure:
(“la la la, nothing to see here!” like damn)
This practice was continued by invading conquerers, particularly Muslims (as they simply had far greater and longer lasting control than anyone else) but also Christians if they were in the area. Defacing local rulers is pretty common practice by conquerers anywhere you go in the world, but the spiritual/emotional/mental affect it had on Egyptians would not have gone unnoticed, so it was a good tool to undermine popular morale. 
The legend of Napoleon’s forces shooting off the nose is pure fiction, easily debunked by multiple scholars’ accounts and artists’ renditions of the Sphinx from before Napoleon was even born showing the Sphinx without a nose. The Sphinx’s nose was deliberately removed, but evidence strongly supports this being a religiously motivated act, not racial. Muslim officials deliberately defaced the Sphinx (made extremely clear by the large chisel marks left on the Sphinx’s face) because they repeatedly found local Egyptians worshipping or making homage to it. This was of course unacceptable to their new rulers, so they destroyed the statue and therefore whatever life force the Egyptians believed was within it. 
By the time we fast forward far enough in time to get to white European imperialists, noses have been getting knocked off Egyptian statues for hundreds and thousands of years. Did these Europeans deface more statues? I’m sure some did, but probably cause they were racist dicks, not out of any great international organized scheme at historical revision (please, you really think they were thinking that far ahead? all they cared about was money at this point). Europeans crafted cultural perceptions of racial superiority by denying the existence of Black Kingdoms, not by writing home “yeah these African kingdoms are totally rad and totally white.” Their approach was definitely more “African kingdoms? What African kingdoms?” But this all deals more with subSaharan peoples, not Egyptians.
At the end of the day, Egyptian archaeology ends up with lots of noseless statues, brought about by a number of factors:
1. some fell to environment and deterioration (as do all statues in the world)2. some fell to political violence and social upheaval3. some fell to religious foreign conquerers4. and finally some fell to European invaders
But to claim that all statues were defaced at the same time by the same people for the same reasons is just grossly inaccurate and is deliberate misrepresentation of the facts to create hyperbole. Egypt has a long and vibrant and at times tragic (and at others inspiring!) history, with plenty of truth to inspire lots of debate and discussion, so please, don’t dilute all this with falsehoods. 
PS - I swear I thought we’d gotten past this by now, but Cleopatra was a Macedonian Greek, and was heir to a long line of Macedonian Greeks. The Ptolemaic Dynasty was established after Alexander the Great conquered Egypt and established one of his generals as ruler. They adopted some Egyptian customs (mainly sibling marriage of the ruling family), but were always staunchly Greek. Cleopatra is indeed interesting though, because while her predecessors as a practice didn’t even speak Egyptian, Cleopatra learned and frequently spoke Egyptian, and very closely associated herself with the goddess Isis. But cultural blending aside, she was Greek, and her successor Caesarion was half Roman ala Julius Caesar.

Hey above blogger, I love you for schooling these dumb-dumbs on history and archaeology. And yes, for the last frickin’ time, Cleopatra was a descendent of Ptolemy, one of Alexander’s generals, and thus a Macedonian.
EESH. 
And FWIW 19th century Europeans acted horrendously destructive against much of Greece and Rome’s own treasures (Lord Elgin, anybody) because archaeology was only a beginning science and also because many of the items they came across did not fit their pre-conceived notions of classical antiquity.

eros-dikaios:

kanirou:

fatfeistyandfashionable:

bathsabbath:

piscula:

skooth:

bhavatarini:

myblacksexuality:

poetofwar333:

#cleopatra with the nose knocked off. I wonder if people still think she was European like the movies betray…

I still think it’s one of the most desperate things whites have done to blacks and to black history. The disrespect is outrageous. They came to our country and mentally could not fathom how these black civilizations could be so great. They literally rode through our lands and shot the noses off of our statues. Why? So that the statues would no longer resemble the African people and they could LIE about the origins of Egypt and countless other civilizations. It was a widespread practice. It’s why statues of Pharaoh’s and their wives have no noses. It’s why the Sphinx has no nose. When I was in middle and high school, we were taught that the noses had fell off due to time and poor craftsmanship! They have literally tried to teach us that our ancestors were shitty builders of noses just to hide their malicious destruction of our heritage. European fears of African peoples had to come from somewhere. I want to know what part of the history is missing. There’s something that they don’t want to be told.

The shade is real

i was taught that the noses fell off as well and actually continued to believe this. in retrospect this makes no sense, considering greek/roman statues pretty much always have intact noses whereas egyptian ones are always conveniently missing theirs. thank you for pointing this out to me, i hadn’t even made that connection until now.

The bolded was me too and I am seriously embarrassed that I never even thought about how that could be false.

Damnnn. I hate myself for not realizing this.

    I hate myself even more, since I know the ancient Egyptians created their sculptural works with the idea of permanence in mind. They were literally built to last throughout the afterlife. Notice how the majority of their monumental sculpture is stone-bound, without any protruding elements or breakable appendages. That’s because many of these sculptures were intended to house the life-force (Ka) of those they portrayed. Of their favorite materials were basalt and diorite, both extremely hard stones that were incredibly difficult to carve. Meaning a nose just doesn’t “fall off” because of “poor craftsmanship,” you would literally have to take a hammer to it. Fuckers.

I’m embarrassed and ashamed to add myself to the list of people who where taught that the noses “fell off” as a child and never once stopped to think about how incongruous that was to everything I had been taught about the Egyptian civilizations and their propensity for lasting works of art.

This is so inaccurate. 

Noses are always the first thing to go on statues, they protrude from the rest of the sculpture and are unsupported. This is true of Greek and Roman statues as well. This is Sulla, Roman general, consul, dictator, reformer, and kind of important. This is also the best bust we have of him and the one you will find in just about any textbook. 

Also, can we pause to think about environment here? The Mediterranean is much more long-lasting-statue friendly than Egypt is. Differences in humidity, wind patterns, building materials, and especially sand storms have immense effect on how well statues and carvings are preserved. 

More importantly, statue defamation was a practice that goes far back into Egyptian history itself. As previously (and accurately) mentioned, many statues were believed to either contain, preserve, or safeguard a deceased’s spirit after death. Burial statues would be deliberately defaced as acts of revenge, intimidation, or political leverage in times of upheaval. Political rival wants to hit you where it hurts? Deface your family’s statues. New dynasty in charge? Deface every statue of the old blood so their spirits can never hurt you. 

An unfortunately perfect example involves Hatshepsut, Queen and Pharaoh of Egypt who was immensely successful and powerful. Upon the succession of Thutmose III, he eventually ordered that all public images of her be defaced, some merely having the facial features knocked off, or sometimes full-out erasure:


(“la la la, nothing to see here!” like damn)

This practice was continued by invading conquerers, particularly Muslims (as they simply had far greater and longer lasting control than anyone else) but also Christians if they were in the area. Defacing local rulers is pretty common practice by conquerers anywhere you go in the world, but the spiritual/emotional/mental affect it had on Egyptians would not have gone unnoticed, so it was a good tool to undermine popular morale. 

The legend of Napoleon’s forces shooting off the nose is pure fiction, easily debunked by multiple scholars’ accounts and artists’ renditions of the Sphinx from before Napoleon was even born showing the Sphinx without a nose. The Sphinx’s nose was deliberately removed, but evidence strongly supports this being a religiously motivated act, not racial. Muslim officials deliberately defaced the Sphinx (made extremely clear by the large chisel marks left on the Sphinx’s face) because they repeatedly found local Egyptians worshipping or making homage to it. This was of course unacceptable to their new rulers, so they destroyed the statue and therefore whatever life force the Egyptians believed was within it. 

By the time we fast forward far enough in time to get to white European imperialists, noses have been getting knocked off Egyptian statues for hundreds and thousands of years. Did these Europeans deface more statues? I’m sure some did, but probably cause they were racist dicks, not out of any great international organized scheme at historical revision (please, you really think they were thinking that far ahead? all they cared about was money at this point). Europeans crafted cultural perceptions of racial superiority by denying the existence of Black Kingdoms, not by writing home “yeah these African kingdoms are totally rad and totally white.” Their approach was definitely more “African kingdoms? What African kingdoms?” But this all deals more with subSaharan peoples, not Egyptians.

At the end of the day, Egyptian archaeology ends up with lots of noseless statues, brought about by a number of factors:

1. some fell to environment and deterioration (as do all statues in the world)
2. some fell to political violence and social upheaval
3. some fell to religious foreign conquerers
4. and finally some fell to European invaders

But to claim that all statues were defaced at the same time by the same people for the same reasons is just grossly inaccurate and is deliberate misrepresentation of the facts to create hyperbole. Egypt has a long and vibrant and at times tragic (and at others inspiring!) history, with plenty of truth to inspire lots of debate and discussion, so please, don’t dilute all this with falsehoods. 

PS - I swear I thought we’d gotten past this by now, but Cleopatra was a Macedonian Greek, and was heir to a long line of Macedonian Greeks. The Ptolemaic Dynasty was established after Alexander the Great conquered Egypt and established one of his generals as ruler. They adopted some Egyptian customs (mainly sibling marriage of the ruling family), but were always staunchly Greek. Cleopatra is indeed interesting though, because while her predecessors as a practice didn’t even speak Egyptian, Cleopatra learned and frequently spoke Egyptian, and very closely associated herself with the goddess Isis. But cultural blending aside, she was Greek, and her successor Caesarion was half Roman ala Julius Caesar.

Hey above blogger, I love you for schooling these dumb-dumbs on history and archaeology. And yes, for the last frickin’ time, Cleopatra was a descendent of Ptolemy, one of Alexander’s generals, and thus a Macedonian.

EESH. 

And FWIW 19th century Europeans acted horrendously destructive against much of Greece and Rome’s own treasures (Lord Elgin, anybody) because archaeology was only a beginning science and also because many of the items they came across did not fit their pre-conceived notions of classical antiquity.



starfieldeyes:

venticupofmeh:

Working at my job has made me realize that I am really awful with names.

Like I can see someone every day and remember that they want a venti 2 pump mocha with 1% milk 140 degrees with light whip and 2 sweet n low but I literally haven’t the slightest clue what letter their name even begins with.

Your barista misspelled your name cause they see 1000 people a day and can’t remember everyone.




audreyii-fic:

theamayasakarutaexperience:

bemusedlybespectacled:

amuseoffyre:

nothingeverlost:

Fourteen years ago, a Death Eater named Bellatrix Lestrange used the Cruciatus Curse on my parents. She tortured them for information, but they never gave in. I’m quite proud to be their son.

This hurts. A lot.

One of the scenes that I will never be able to forget from the book is the scene when they’re at the hospital and Neville’s mother comes and gives him the sweet wrapper. She’s been tortured to insanity, but some part of her, some tiny diamond hard fragment of who she was, smothered by the shattered remains of herself remembers her son enough to want to make him smile.

She gives him a present to make him smile, and you just know Neville took that sweet wrapper home with him and put it in a box with all the other random pieces of rubbish she has given to him over the past 14 years.

This is why Neville’s story makes me hurt much more than Harry. Neville’s parents are still there. He can still see them and touch them, but he can never and will never know what they think of him, of what he has become. But no matter what happens, he will do every damn thing he can to be a man they would be proud of. Even if he’s scared, he will be brave because they were.

Re: Neville will never know what they think of him: it’s interesting that Harry, for all he never knew his parents, interacts with them quite a lot for an orphan. Both the Priori Incantatem spell and the Resurrection Stone let Lily and James talk to Harry. They tell him how brave he is and how proud they are and how much they love him.

Neville gets a bubblegum wrapper.

what the hell made any of you think this was okay

(Source: the-padfoots)




lesserjoke:

Doctor Who: The Story of Martha



constantly torn between thinking god damn that looks so stupid and reminding myself that it’s not me, it’s not my choice



(Source: lovingmalemodels)



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